Digging Deeper into Jay Inslee's job plan

Digging Deeper into Jay Inslee's job plan
TRI-CITIES, Wash. -- The governor's race is over and now it will be a matter of seeing whether Jay Inslee can solve the money troubles of the state. And that includes putting people back to work. Inslee touted green energy as the solution to many of our problems. Washington's new governor elect is not shy about investing in green energy.

Inslee says in one of this ads, "Now our economy needs a new approach. That's why I wrote a book on clean energy."

But Democrat Jay Inslee says it's more than just saving the planet. He believes this green focus will put people to work.

It was his main platform while running for Governor. So how will it affect you? Can he live up to those promises? I examined Inslee's job plan. Those new jobs in green energy could end up here in the Tri-Cities.

It's encouraging for job seekers like Tim Wheat. He says, "Been doing a lot of nuclear energy searching."

Tim has been unemployed for about a month.

Tim explains, "My profession is instrumentation and controls. I haven't really found too much around this area."

The Tri-Cities and the surrounding region has been a target for wind and water energy in Washington.And for good reason.

He continues, "It's pretty desolate here. We have the space for it."

But local economists worry green jobs aren't a lasting solution.

Local Economist, Ajsa Suljic tells KEPR, "They don't create a large number of jobs, they create good-paying, stable jobs. Once it's created or built up, people are only needed to operate."

Despite the rapid population growth in the Tri-Cities the jobs haven't grown as fast. Just two years ago, we were adding 3% more jobs every year. This year, only about 1%. Job seekers can only be hopeful for the future and for what new state leadership could mean.

"I'm pretty sure I'll get a job," Tim says.

And Governor-elect Inslee will have four-years to live up to those campaign promises.

While jobs in the energy field may increase, the most job growth is expected in manufacturing, construction, education and healthcare.